Parents still prefer their children to play with traditional toys

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Parents still prefer their children to play with traditional toysIn the age of technology, digital and interactive toys, parents still prefer the traditional play time for their kids. That’s what a survey by Very.co.uk shows, reported by the Independent.

The survey shows that many parents still prefer their children to play with traditional toys, instead of the new interactive and digital stuff. Parents prefer their kids to play with chemistry sets, yo-yos, science sets and similar toys.

One in four adults say toys should encourage kids to be creative. They also want the toys to help kids with self-expression and confidence.

Toys are so important to a child’s development and education; they can lead children to new discoveries, helping unlock their potential and their budding passions by encouraging learning, compassion and creativity. This can help set them up for the future and even spark a lifelong interest that can develop into a career path or hobby”, Andrew Roscoe of Very.co.uk which carried out the study, says.

“Adults acknowledge the fact there were certain toys during childhood which had a really positive impact on their growth and development. This shows how toys can encourage inquisitiveness, physical exercise and creativity, as well as social skills development when playing with peers.”

Over two-thirds of the 2000 polled parents say their kids play with the same toys they did. Parents often fell some toys are timeless classics and are more helpful than today’s tech toys.

The study also revealed most adults believe young children should be exposed to shape sorters, dolls, teddy bears and ride-on cars, while those of a slightly older age benefit from bikes, train sets, telescopes and chemistry sets.

Parents also say that role-play is important in play time. Most parents want toys to be fun and entertaining as top priorities. The secondary are the toys to be educational and inspire creativity.

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